The Writer-Editor Relationship | My Biggest Fan and Strongest Critic

A writer is very close to their work. What may appear to be an error to the editor, may go unnoticed in the eyes of the author. That is the difference between a writer and an editor. A little tough love here and there from the editor is only to bring out the best in the writer.

The Midwife’s Journey | Ten Things Editors Wish Authors Knew

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If the author is the mother giving birth, I am the midwife making sure that the baby comes into this world safe and sound. Each work of creation is different, and comes into this world through a different passage. Having worked with lots of writers and writing styles, I know that it’s a different experience each time. No two births are ever the same. 

The Author-Editor Relationship | The Mother and the Midwife

To authors, a book is a precious baby that they’ve nurtured and brought into this world. But giving birth is almost never a solitary process. The editor is the midwife – the one that stands by the author and pushes the writer as they labour through the long hours before the baby is finally born. 

A Guide to Co-Authoring: Six Fantastic Techniques to Share the Load

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I first came across the concept of co-authoring in a post on Co-Authors. It inspired me to research further, brainstorm and come up with a few techniques through which writers can collaborate to create their best work yet.  

The 4Ps of Publishing: Publisher, Process, Passage and People

I have worked with many authors who are amazing writers but get stuck when it comes to dealing with the commercial side of publishing. It’s a sentiment I understand all too well. I was once in those very same shoes – wondering how in the world I was ever going to achieve my lifelong dream of publication. I’ve learnt it all the hard way so others won’t have to. 

A Snapshot of the History of Publishing: from illiteracy to e-readers

Traditional publishing is a long time-consuming process. Big publishing houses are highly selective when choosing content. If an author doesn’t have an existing audience, it becomes even more difficult to crack a deal. On the other hand, self-publishing favours the author in many ways. The author has full authority to decide when to publish the book. He or she also retains all rights relating to the book.